Photographing the Benson Sculpture Park

Gorilla face

Gorilla face

I wouldn’t make a good photojournalist. If I was, I would have gotten an establishing shot to show where I was. I would have photographed each sculpture in it’s entirety before zooming into the details. I would have photographed the plaques that showed who the artist is and what the sculpture is called.

So where was I? I was at the Benson Sculpture Park in Loveland, Colorado. The park contains a lagoon, flowers and plants like any park should. It just happens to also include 139 sculptures situated through the walkways and is open to the public. The purchase of the sculptures for the park is funded by proceeds from an annual show and sale.

So what did I do? I zoomed into the details, usually the face, of the sculpture’s that I found interesting. You can see the assortment of animals and people that are the subject of most of the sculptures by clicking on the link to my SmugMug page

Thanks to Shirley, my hostess and tour guide, I did remember a few stories she told me….

The hands that don’t meet in this depiction of ring around the rosie represents a child who had died and was therefore missing. It provides children, including her grandchildren, the opportunity to be photographed filling the gap.

Missing child formation

Missing child formation

Sitting on the gorilla was also a photo op for the grandkids.:)

Gorilla sculpture

Gorilla sculpture

This is the most controversial of the sculptures. It was originally located in the center of town, but there were so many protests, they moved it to a secluded part of the park.

Controversial

Controversial

This finishes my trip to Colorado.
Next up…The hike-a-thon for Creating Partnerships for Progress

Photographing the Wild Animal Sanctuary

The Wild Animal Sanctuary is a 720 acres with species-specific habitat ranging from 5-acres to 25-acres.

Future Expansion

Future Expansion

They specialize in rescuing large predators like Tigers, Lions, Bears & Wolves to name a few. These animals have been rescued from private owners, circuses or other zoos that could not take proper care of them. The goal is to let these animals live out there natural lives in these large enclosures which include underground dens for shelter and hibernation.

What makes visiting this sanctuary different than visiting the zoo, is that you get to see the animals from above. They have built a “Mile into the Wild Walkway” that lets you walk above the different habitats. In the orientation, they said that was good for the animals because they don’t see us as a predator or food so our presence up there doesn’t stress them.

Part of the "Mile into the Wild Walkway"

Part of the “Mile into the Wild Walkway”

But just like at the zoo, the animals like to spend the day sleeping unless they are eating. I so needed a longer lens for this location. 🙂

Click on anyone of them to view them all larger.

Photographing City Park, Denver

After a week of training in Denver, we were sprung early on Friday, so we went to City Park. City Park is an urban park on 330 acres in east-central Denver. I had seen a photograph in one of the tourist magazines that I wanted to try and get the same vantage point of the Denver skyline. I didn’t quite get the view of the mountains in the background that I was hoping for. Here’s a sampling of my late afternoon efforts.

Click on anyone of them to view them all larger.

Next stop…The Wild Animal Sanctuary outside of Denver